Thursday, 22 October 2020

Promoters Of Secularism

Updated: November 29, 2014 5:45 am

NOW while on the one hand Soniaji’s disservice to secularism by way of ditching Shahi Imam so unceremoniously is deeply disturbing for secular Satiricus, on the other hand her indifference towards what’s happening in the Christian world is pretty puzzling for him. Look, for instance, at the UK, ruled by the defender of the Christian faith. An organisation of municipal bodies called Association of Local Councils has recently banned prayer to keep them ‘secular’. When a council that was member of the association passed a resolution to include a prayer session in its meetings, the association warned against it, ruling that prayers are “not part of their duties.” In righteous retaliation an incensed leader of an organisation called Christian People’s Alliance retorted, “This is part of the secularization of our society….Having Christian praying is saying Christian values are good values….”

Good (Christian) God! This non-Christian nitwit was all along labouring under the anti-secular impression that good Christian values are as good as Christian prices. For in the past this price piously paid by merciful missionaries—callously called “vendors of Christianity” by Gandhiji—to poor and ignorant Hindu tribals was a generous fistful of rice to convert them into what came to be called “Rice Christians”. Now that barter trade in selling Christianity is history. Now the roving rural missionaries have been replaced by a flourishing MNC called the Church, and not long back its then CEO came on a business trip to India, when he delightedly declared secular India to be a fertile field for a Christian harvest. So now we have regular books written on how to “plant” Christianity. Is not all this in the service of Sonia’s secularism? So, says secular Satiricus to oh-so-secular Sonia, never forget that if Imams are the protectors of Indian secularism, Popes are its promoters.

NOBLE PURPOSE

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