Monday, 10 August 2020

Gods Go Online To Help Mankind

Updated: July 20, 2013 11:20 am

It is a surreal novel, co-authored by two writers, who have never met. It is an experimental book wherein the Gods move from the realm of the fantasy to the real world in the quest of solutions to the human dilemmas as they decide the fate of their creation—mankind. The story has been woven against the backdrop: What if the Gods were living in the midst of mankind? What if the Gods were as confused about life’s meaning as humans? What if the Gods were addicted to social media? Christ lives on his own island where the dead souls are welcomed to the after-world. Krishna lives in the harsh real world as a humble pantry boy employed in a hospital—easing the final journey of the people, who are dying. Buddy Roy, the Buddha, sends his calming waves to the world from afar. Ati, the God of Atheists, lives on his island with his own set of followers. While Gods go about their tasks they connect on Facebook to ‘chat up’ God things.

The story begins when Chris reads an article in the newspaper about social networking and decides to open a Facebook account. He is surprised to see that many of the Gods already have an account there. Once on Facebook, he begins chatting with Krishna and Gautam Buddha, aka Buddy Roy, and most of their conversations are philosophical in nature, about the meaning of life. Then the book suddenly takes a U-turn and introduces a string of different characters who serve no purpose to the plot.

The Gods travel between the imagined worlds—Clacton-on-Sea, Jaywick, Frinton-on-Sea, the underwater World of Mermaids and the real world. Human stories of mortals are woven within the fabric of the main story of Gods. A fast-paced novel, Ohh! Gods Are Online moves between the worlds of men, Gods, and evil forces. Men are transformed to animals and Gods live like men. The characters slide from one life to afterlife and the next life.

Humour, philosophy, fantasy, mythology, and a compelling story are crafted together to write the novel. The 216-page novel takes many turns and twists as the writers played a game of challenging each other with new characters and plots. It reveals that Gods do not want to convert. In this book, there is no struggle between Gods to win over followers. The message for priests and preachers is that they should reform themselves and stop creating strife in the world. The only way forward for faiths is to live in harmony and to understand the principles of other religions. Internet is breaking barriers and bringing people of different faiths closer. So religions will have to become more flexible.

The characters are those we have grown up with as a result it is effortless to recount to them save for to envision them online is what craft it so much entertaining. It is profoundly ingrained in folklore and most of the personalities appear so genuine that you will covet to trust them.

The book is as breezy and interesting as at appears from the cover. It is funny and witty. On the whole, it is a gasp of fresh and clean tone,

By Ashok Kumar

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